Reading

Reading is an integral part of our school curriculum and impacts on all learning. A strong emphasis is placed on a love of reading from Foundation Stage to Year 6. This is in the form of one to one reading, shared and guided reading as well as independent reading.

We use the “Oxford Reading Tree” (ORT) scheme all the way through school, offering the children interesting, up to date books. Each child is assessed through “Mentoring for Success,” (MfS) to ascertain which ORT stage they are on. Teachers and support staff then match these stages with tbe children’s guided reading and home reading books. Children bring a reading book home from school 2-3 times a week.

Our children’s reading is supported and challenged through using Bug Club (www.bugclub.co.uk), Bear Words (phase 1) and MfS key words (Phases 2 and 3), and we have a subscription to First News (www.firstnews.co.uk).

We also enjoy going to our school library once a week to borrow from the wide selection of books.

Phonics

We follow the “Letters and Sounds” phonics programme (www.letters-and-sounds.com), supported by activities from “Phonics Play” (www.phonicsplay.co.uk). This is a resource which aims to build children’s speaking and listening skills in their own right as well as to prepare children for learning to read by developing their phonic knowledge and skills. It is a detailed and systematic programme for teaching phonic skills starting in Nursery. There are six overlapping phases.

Nursery children have a daily phonics session which moves to four sessions a week in Key Stage 1. In Key Stage 2, this becomes an intervention, targeting children with gaps in their phonics knowledge.

To support kinaesthetic learners we use the actions from “Jolly Phonics” (jollylearning.co.uk) in phase 1 of school.

Year Group Learning

Reception
Reception expectations will be added soon.

Year 1
These are the national standard expectations for year 1 reading.

Word Reading

  • Match all 40+ graphemes to their phonemes
  • Blend sounds in unfamiliar words
  • Divide words into syllables, for example, pocket, rabbit, carrot, thunder, sunset
  • Read compound words, for example, football, playground, farmyard, bedroom
  • Read words with contractions, e.g. I’m, I’ll, we’ll, and understand that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s)
  • Read phonically decodable texts with confidence.
  • Read words containing ‘s, es, ing, ed, er , est’ endings
  • Read words which have the prefix –un added
  • Add the endings –ing, –ed and –er to verbs where no change is needed to the root word
  • Read words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs (grapheme, phoneme correspondence)

Reading Comprehension

  • Say what they like or dislike about a text
  • Link what they read or hear read to their own experiences
  • Retell key stories orally using narrative language
  • Understand and talk about the main characteristics within a known key story
  • Learn some poems and rhymes by heart.
    Use prior knowledge, context and vocabulary provided to understand texts
  • Check that the text makes sense to them as they read and correct miscues
  • Begin to draw inferences from the text and/or the illustrations
  • Make predictions based on the events in the text
  • Explain what they understand about a text

Year 2
These are the national standard expectations for year 2 reading.

Word Reading

  • Decode automatically and fluently
  • Read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught
  • Recognise and read alternative sounds for graphemes
  • Read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same GPCs
  • Read words containing common suffixes
  • Read further common exception words
  • Read and notice unusual correspondence between grapheme and phoneme
  • Read most words quickly and accurately when they have been frequently encountered without overt sounding and blending
  • Read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation
  • Read books fluently and confidently

Reading Comprehension

  • Talk about and give an opinion on a range of texts
  • Discuss the sequence of events in books and how they are related to each other
  • Use prior knowledge and context and vocabulary explored to understand texts
  • Retell orally some stories, including fairy stories and traditional tales
  • Read for meaning, checking that the text makes sense and correcting inaccurate reading
  • Know and recognise simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry
  • Talk about favourite words and phrases
  • Increase repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear
  • Answer and ask appropriate questions and make predictions on the basis of what has been read so far
  • Draw simple inferences from illustrations, events and characters’ actions and speech

Year 3

These are the national standard expectations for year 3 reading.

Word Reading

  • Apply knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to read aloud and to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words
  • Read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word
  • Attempt pronunciation of unfamiliar words drawing on prior knowledge of similar looking words

Reading Comprehension

  • Experience and discuss a range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • Know that non-fiction books are structured in different ways and be able to use them effectively
  • Begin to understand that narrative books are structured in different ways, for example, quest stories and stories with dilemmas
  • Ask questions to improve understanding of a text
  • Predict what might happen from details stated
  • Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions
  • Use dictionaries to check the meaning of unfamiliar words
  • Identify main idea of a text
  • Identify how structure, and presentation contribute to the meaning of texts
  • Retrieve and record information from non-fiction
  • Discuss books, poems and other works that are read aloud and independently, taking turns and listening to others’ opinions
  • Explain and discuss understanding of books, poems and other material, both those read aloud and those read independently
  • Prepare poems to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action

Year 4
These are the national standard expectations for year 4 reading.

Word Reading

  • Apply knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to read aloud and to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words
  • Read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word
  • Attempt pronunciation of unfamiliar words drawing on prior knowledge of similar looking words

Reading Comprehension

  • Know which books to select for specific purposes, especially in relation to science, history and geography learning
  • Use dictionaries to check the meaning of unfamiliar words
  • Discuss and record words and phrases that writers use to engage and impact on the reader
  • Know and recognise some of the literary conventions in text types covered
  • Begin to understand simple themes in books
  • Prepare poems to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action
  • Explain the meaning of words in context
  • Ask questions to improve understanding of a text
  • Infer meanings and begin to justify them with evidence from the text
  • Predict what might happen from details stated and deduced information
  • Identify how the writer has used precise word choices for effect to impact on the reader
  • Identify some text type organisational features, for example, narrative, explanation, persuasion
  • Retrieve and record information from non-fiction
  • Make connections with prior knowledge and experience
  • Begin to build on others’ ideas and opinions about a text in discussion
  • Explain why text types are organised in a certain way

Year 5
These are the national standard expectations for year 5 reading.

Word Reading

  • Apply knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to read aloud and to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • Read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.
  • Attempt pronunciation of unfamiliar words drawing on prior knowledge of similar looking words.
  • Re-read and read ahead to check for meaning.

Reading Comprehension

  • Become familiar with and talk about a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories and books from other cultures and traditions and know their features.
  • Read non-fiction texts and identify purpose and structures and grammatical features and evaluate how effective they are.
  • Identify significant ideas , events and characters and discuss their significance.
  • Learn poems by heart. for example, narrative verse, haiku.
  • Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
  • Use meaning-seeking strategies to explore the meaning of words in context.
  • Use meaning – seeking strategies to explore the meaning of idiomatic and figurative language.
  • Identify and comment on writer’s use of language for effect. for example, precisely chosen adjectives, similes and personification.
  • Identify grammatical features used by writer – rhetorical questions, varied sentence lengths, varied sentence starters, empty words – to impact on the reader.
  • Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions.
  • Justify inferences with evidence from the text.
  • Make predictions from what has been read.
  • Summarise the main ideas drawn from a text.
  • Identify the effect of the context on a text. for example, historical or other cultures.
  • Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to the meaning of a text.
  • Express a personal point of view about a text, giving rea sons.
  • Make connections between other similar texts, prior knowledge and experience.
  • Compare different versions of texts and talk about their differences and similarities.
  • Listen to and build on others’ ideas and opinions about a text.
  • Present an oral overview or summary of a text.
  • Present the author’s viewpoint of a text.
  • Present a personal point of view based on what has been read.
  • Listen to others’ personal point of view.
  • Explain a personal point of view and give reasons.
  • Know the difference between fact and opinion.
  • Use knowledge of structure of text type to find key information.
  • Use text marking to identify key information in a text.
  • Make notes from text marking.

Year 6
These are the national standard expectations for year 6 reading.

Word Reading

  • Apply knowledge of root words to read aloud and to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • Apply knowledge of prefixes and suffixes to read aloud and to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • Use combined knowledge of phonemes and word derivations to pronounce words correctly. for example: arachnophobia, audience
  • Attempt pronunciation of unfamiliar words drawing on prior knowledge of similar looking words.
  • Read fluently, using punctuation to inform meaning.

Reading Comprehension

  • Read and become familiar with a wide range of books, including modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Read books that are structured in different ways.
  • Recognise texts that contain features from more than one text type.
  • Consider and evaluate how effectively texts are structured and laid out.
  • Read non-fiction texts to support other curriculum areas.
  • Read closely to ensure understanding.
  • Recommend books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices.
  • Identify and discuss themes in a range of writing and across longer texts.
  • Identify and discuss the conventions of different text types.
  • Identify key points in an appropriate text.
  • Learn a range of poetry by heart. for example, narrative verse, sonnet.
  • Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
  • Identify and comment on writer’s choice of vocabulary, giving examples and explanation.
  • Identify and explain how writers use grammatical features for effect. for example, the use of short sentences to build tension.
  • Show awareness of the writers’ craft by commenting on use of language, grammatical features and structure of texts.
  • Express a personal point of view about a text, giving reasons linked to evidence from texts.
  • Raise queries about texts.
  • Make connections between other similar texts, prior knowledge and experience and explain the links.
  • Compare different versions of texts and explain the differences and similarities.
  • Listen to others’ ideas and opinions about a text.
  • Build on others’ ideas and opinions about a text in discussion.
  • Explain and comment on explicit and implicit points of view.
  • Summarise key information from different parts of a text.
  • Recognise the writer’s point of view and discuss it.
  • Present a personal point of view based on what has been read.
  • Present a counter-argument in response to others’ points of view.
  • Provide reasoned justifications for their views.
  • Refer to the text to support opinion.
  • Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.
  • Find information using skimming to establish main idea.
  • Use scanning to find specific information.
  • Text mark to make research efficient and fast.
  • Organise information or evidence appropriately.